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Jun 10Liked by Nikko Kennedy

Hi Nikko! Thank you for sharing this as I did find it helpful! I have officially successfully weaned my 16-mo old off of day feedings but it’s the night feedings I’m struggling with...it’s rare she will nurse in the day - usually only if she’s been hurt or it’s a random occurrence per her request but it’s rare. Nighttime’s however, if I try to keep boob away or set some kind of boundary by keeping clothing covering the breasts or turning my back, it only works some of the time, the other times, she ends up crying and crying a lot /hard as if I’m abandoning her (this is how it feels and what the cry sounds like so I’ll usually give I ). I know it will be easier on me if I do wean her at night because another baby is on the way in about 3-4 more months! She will be 19mo when the baby arrives...but I don’t know what else to do...any suggestions for what I can do now at night? Or what I will have to do when baby 2 comes / things to try?

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So, with night weaning, what usually works is getting out of bed and walking with them. The walking, shushing, bobbing, eventually usually gets them back to sleep. I did this while pregnant last time and I also actually let my girl eat my preggo nighttime snacks with me—she was a little older than your girl so I don’t know if yours has a full set of molars yet?—but we would munch on dried currants (sour!) and soft jerky and macadamia nuts and sip water. I kept a little pack under the bed. It was our little secret thing in the night while everyone else was asleep. Then, as she got used to it, I eventually took snacks away and she was actually super okay with it because we put a hard stop on eating/drinking in bed after she spilled tons of water and even she agreed that was a big bummer!

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So helpful! I only have one babe but I know we will have another in the next year or two and I hadn’t thought about tandem feeding, I think I assumed I’d only feed one at a time because that’s all I ever saw. It’s interesting you mentioning the social pressure because my little guy is 9 months old and we don’t have any plans to stop nursing but it’s interesting how people have already made comments to me about when I will stop or should stop. My husband and I really do so much that is against the grain it’s almost a full time job to maintain boundaries but also to have to ignore advice that I’ll never ever take lol

I’m so curious about your elimination communication journey ! My full intention was to practice that with my son from birth but after an unexpected birth and recovery I couldn’t take on that task (and it being winter) and now at 9 months I have him being in diapers ! It’s been hard to stick to teaching him to potty because I find I have to commit to being at home or somewhere where I can hold him diaper less and be able to manage any misses- once we are back home from road trip I will see to set an environment at home for us move away from the diapers.

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Hi Aleksandra! I love chatting about elimination communication. It doesn’t mean I don’t have my baby in diapers! I do! What it means is I also help them void outside of their diapers. My set times are when they wake up, when I am changing a wet diaper anyways, and before bed. When I notice they are starting to go (especially if it is a poop) or if it seems like they are about to, I will take their diaper off and help them to the potty. When it’s all done, I put their diapers back on! I don’t like to actually remove the diapers from the routine until they are actually potty independent because it becomes so much harder to keep track of when they go and they can also develop bad habits of just going wherever and that is not at all fun. Yes, EC can be chilly in the winter, but in the summer the pee turns to ammonia much faster, so both have their challenges.

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